Match.com Takes Viewers to School

Match.com Takes Viewers to School

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The ad provides a sample of what I can expect from visiting match.com—a pleasant date. Gets the name, Match.com, out there and associates the name with a sample of the reward. This is a step forward.

The rest of the ad is squandered opportunity.

The ad is trying to solve two problems at once: (1) people hesitate to use online dating sites and; (2) people who are using online dating sites are going to other online dating sites. Given the growth in use of online dating sites, Match.com doesn’t have to worry about the first problem. That problem seems to be curing itself. Match.com needs to fix the one real problem—that people are going to other online dating sites instead of Match.com.

The ad contains a lot of information, both said by the announcer and printed on screen. The approach assumes viewers are paying attention as if there was going to be a test. But, of course, viewers don’t pay attention. Unfortunately, when the announcer’s fact-heavy dialogue is typed on the screen, the Match.com experience begins to feel like being in class.

Match.com is right to emphasize their size advantage. People pay an awful lot of attention to the preferences of others when forming their own preferences. But surely there is some way to visually represent Match.com’s big size advantage. It’s a shame to limit that wonderful advantage to words on a screen.

 

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