Artful Exaggeration of the Problem, But What Was that Brand Name?

Artful Exaggeration of the Problem, But What Was that Brand Name?

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A child’s block morphs into a sinister colony of bacteria, “Blockoccus.” The ad’s artful exaggeration gets and holds the audience’s attention. The result is that the problem of bacteria on children’s toys comes to mind more easily.

When the product solves a problem, the advertiser is always torn between on the one hand, focusing on the problem and giving a little less attention to the brand, or focusing on the brand and what it does and giving a little less attention to the problem. If the brand name is distinctive and memorable and suggests the solution, focusing on the problem works well. If a brand name has those qualities when people think of the problem, the brand name naturally occurs to them, so getting people to think of the problem works well.

A brand name like Drano is distinctive and memorable and suggests the solution. With a name like Drano, the brand just needs people to think about clogged drains and the brand name comes to mind.

Protex, unfortunately, is not distinctive, not memorable, and only vaguely suggests the solution. Protex could easily be the name of a paint, computer anti-virus software, or furniture polish. With a brand name like Protex, focusing heavily on the problem doesn’t work very well. The ad needs to bring the brand name and its particular benefit to life. Instead, this ad brings the problem to life.   The reader can easily be fascinated by the image and fail to register the brand name.

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